Publications by Katharina Pflügner

2020

Pflügner, K., Maier, C., and Weitzel, T. (2020)
The direct and indirect influence of mindfulness on techno-stressors and job burnout: A quantitative study of white-collar workers
Forthcoming in: Computers in Human Behavior (CHB)

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This study investigates how mindfulness at work influences white-collar workers’ technostress. Building on our understanding that perceived techno-stressors lead to job burnout, we apply the transactional model of stress and the model of mindfulness to understand to what degree mindfulness reduces the perception of techno-stressors and whether mindfulness mitigates the effect of perceived techno-stressors on job burnout. Our analysis of quantitative data collected in a survey of 134 white-collar workers who use information systems regularly at work confirms that mindfulness leads to lower levels of perceived techno-stressors, but does not also mitigate the effect of perceived techno-stressors on job burnout. The study contributes to technostress research by showing how mindfulness can help manage technostress but also by illustrating the boundaries of mindfulness in terms of technostress mitigation. We provide practical recommendations for applying our research results to develop technostress prevention measures and assess psychological risk factors at work.

Pflügner, K., Maier, C., Mattke, J., and Weitzel, T. (2020)
Personality Profiles that Put Users at Risk of Perceiving Technostress: A Qualitative Comparative Analysis with the Big Five Personality Traits
Forthcoming in: Business & Information Systems Engineering (BISE)

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Some information systems research has considered that individual personality traits influence whether users feel stressed by information and communication technologies. Personality research suggests, however, that personality traits do not act individually, but interact interdependently to constitute a personality profile that guides individual perceptions and behavior. The study relies on the differential exposure-reactivity model to investigate which personality profiles of the Big Five personality traits predispose users to perceive techno-stressors. Using a questionnaire, data was collected from 221 users working in different organizations. That data was analyzed using fuzzy set Qualitative Comparative Analysis (fsQCA). Based on the results, six different personality profiles that predispose to perceive high techno-stressors are identified. By investigating personality traits in terms of profiles, it is shown that a high and a low level of a personality trait can influence the perception of techno-stressors. The results will allow users and practitioners to identify individuals who are at risk of perceiving techno-stressors based on their personality profile. The post-survey analysis offers starting points for the prevention of perceived techno-stressors and the related negative consequences for specific personality profiles.

Maier, C., Mattke, J., Pflügner, K., and Weitzel, T. (2020)
Smartphone use while driving: A fuzzy-set qualitative comparative analysis of personality profiles influencing frequent high-risk smartphone use while driving in Germany
International Journal of Information Management 55, , https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijinfomgt.2020.102207

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Smartphone use while driving causes car crashes, injuries and high death rates. To date, there is little research into what motivates frequent smartphone use while driving. In this study, we draw on psychological research indicating that personality profiles defined as constellations of multiple personality traits, influence individual beliefs and behaviors. We apply fuzzy-set qualitative comparative analysis (fsQCA) to survey data to derive profiles of drivers who use their smartphone frequently while driving. Our results indicate that personality profiles affect smartphone use behavior while driving and that three equifinal profiles, i.e. distinct constellations of the big five personality traits, influence frequent smartphone use while driving. Interestingly, a single trait can be low in one profile and high in another profile and, depending on the other traits, both profiles might reflect drivers using their smartphone frequently. We contribute to the literature that frequent smartphone use while driving is, to some degree, grounded in personality and that just looking at singular traits can yield misleading results. Complementing these theoretical insights by post-survey interviews, we can reveal distinct measures that reduce frequent smartphone use for each of the three profiles.

Weinert, C., Pflügner, K., and Maier, C. (2020)
Do users respond to challenging and hindering techno-stressors differently? A laboratory experiment
Proceedings of the 2020 NeuroIS Retreat, Vienna, Austria
(Research in Progress)

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Techno-stressors are typically hindering for users. These then cause adverse user responses, such as techno-exhaustion, which in turn result in reduced task performance. Latest technostress research adds two types of stressors: hindrance techno-stressors (HTS) and challenge techno-stressors (CTS). Using that knowledge, this research-in-progress paper develops a research model assuming that both types of techno-stressors lead to different user responses (e.g., motivation, techno-exhaustion, arousal) and, in turn, have a different impact on task performance. To validate that empirically, we propose a mixed-experimental research design following a pre-post approach with three different treatments (e.g., HTS, CTS, control) using among other different biomarkers (e.g., SC, sAA, cortisol) to measure arousal. The expected contributions and future steps are discussed.

Pflügner, K., Reis, L., Maier, C., and Weitzel, T. (2020)
Communication Measures to Reduce Techno-Invasion and Techno-Overload: A Qualitative Study Uncovering Positive and Adverse Effects
Proceedings of the 20th ACM SIGMIS Conference on Computers and People Research, Nuremberg, Germany
Best Paper Award

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The perception of specific techno-stressors, such as techno- invasion or techno-overload, negatively influences employees' performance and organizations' profit. Therefore, it is imperative for organizations to implement specific, deliberate mitigation strategies. Among others, communication measures have the potential to reduce employees' perception of techno-invasion and techno-overload. Basing on 38 semi-structured interviews with working employees, this study identifies five communication measures and their positive and adverse effects in reducing techno-invasion and techno-overload from the perspective of employees. Enlarging related research on technostress mitigation, the results show that none of the analyzed communication measures is limitation-free. Therefore, we conclude that organizations need to introduce more elected and comprehensive communication measures, representing employees' individual needs and characteristics to reduce techno-invasion and techno-overload sustainably. Theoretically, our research enlarges prior findings on technostress and on mitigation of technostress presenting specific mitigation strategies for two specific techno-stressors as well as positive and adverse effects of these mitigation strategies.

Weitzel, T., Maier, C., Weinert, C., Pflügner, K., Oehlhorn, C., Wirth, J., and Laumer, S. (2020)
Generation Z - die Arbeitnehmer von morgen - Ausgewählte Ergebnisse der Recruiting Trends 2020 und der Bewerbungspraxis 2020
Research Report, Otto-Friedrich-Universität Bamberg

Weitzel, T., Maier, C., Weinert, C., Pflügner, K., Oehlhorn, C., Wirth, J., and Laumer, S. (2020)
Digitalisierung und Zukunft der Arbeit - Ausgewählte Ergebnisse der Recruiting Trends 2020 und der Bewerbungspraxis 2020
Research Report, Otto-Friedrich-Universität Bamberg

Weitzel, T., Maier, C., Weinert, C., Pflügner, K., Oehlhorn, C., Wirth, J., and Laumer, S. (2020)
Employer Branding - Ausgewählte Ergebnisse der Recruiting Trends 2020 und der Bewerbungspraxis 2020
Research Report, Otto-Friedrich-Universität Bamberg

Weitzel, T., Maier, C., Weinert, C., Pflügner, K., Oehlhorn, C., Wirth, J., and Laumer, S. (2020)
Mobile Recruiting - Ausgewählte Ergebnisse der Recruiting Trends 2020 und der Bewerbungspraxis 2020
Research Report, Otto-Friedrich-Universität Bamberg

Weitzel, T., Maier, C., Weinert, C., Pflügner, K., Oehlhorn, C., Wirth, J., and Laumer, S. (2020)
Social Recruiting und Active Sourcing - Ausgewählte Ergebnisse der Recruiting Trends 2020 und der Bewerbungspraxis 2020
Research Report, Otto-Friedrich-Universität Bamberg

2019

Pflügner, K., Mattke, J., and Weitzel, T. (2019)
Which Combinations of Techno-Stressors Harm Users and Organizations: A Qualitative Comparative Analysis
Proceedings of the Special Interest Group on Adoption and Diffusion of Information Technology (DIGIT) (Pre-ICIS Workshop), Munich, Germany

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The purpose of the current study is to examine which combinations of techno-stressors lead users to be burned out or perform low due to their stressful use of information systems. Therefore, we take a configurational approach and investigate configurations of techno-stressors for job burnout and low job performance. We conduct a two-wave study, survey 166 employees and analyze the data by using fuzzy set qualitative comparative analysis (fsQCA). The results reveal four configurations leading to job burnout and one configuration leading to low job performance. The study contributes to technostress research by showing that techno-stressors need to be studied in configurations, by highlighting that job burnout and low job performance are caused by different configurations and by revealing that high as well as low levels of a techno-stressor can initiate the adverse reactions of users.

Pflügner, K. and Maier, C. (2019)
Mitigating Technostress: An Empirical Study of Mindfulness and Techno-Stressors
Proceedings of the 25th Americas Conference on Information Systems (AMCIS), Cancún, Mexico

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The purpose of the current study is to examine ways for individuals to mitigate technostress. Practical observations indicate the importance of mindfulness for mitigating stress. Therefore, we study the effect of mindfulness on techno-stressors by relying on the theoretical model of mindfulness by Shapiro and colleagues. A self-rating questionnaire was distributed to employees of different companies, industries, business units, and hierarchical levels. The results of 134 responses reveal that mindfulness leads to lower levels of four out of five techno-stressors. The study contributes that mindfulness is a powerful resource in technologized work environments for the effective and healthy dealing with technologies as well as the mitigation of techno-stressors and that techno-stressors need to be investigated separately. Suggestions for the application of the research results and the development of preventive measures are provided.

Pflügner, K., Mattke, J., and Maier, C. (2019)
Who is Stressed by Using ICTs? A Qualitative Comparison Analysis with the Big Five Personality Traits to Understand Technostress
Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Wirtschaftsinformatik, Siegen, Germany
Best Paper Award

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The purpose of the current study is to reveal personality profiles that predispose to the experience of techno-stressors within an organizational setting. These insights are useful because techno-stressors lead to considerable costs and adverse health effects. We use the theoretical lens of the transaction-based model of stress to study the effect of the Big Five personality traits on techno-stressors. We distributed a self-rating questionnaire among 221 individuals and analyzed data using fuzzy set Qualitative Comparison Analysis. The results reveal that six different personality profiles lead to the experience of techno-stressors. The study contributes to research by revealing that personality traits need to be investigated in profiles when studying their role in technostress and that different profiles of the Big Five predispose to techno-stressors. The results are useful for practitioners as they allow the prevention of techno-stressors and negative consequences by detecting users who are at risk at an early stage.

2018

Pflügner, K. (2018)
Technostress: An Empirical Analysis for Investigating the Role of Mindfulness
Proceedings of the Special Interest Group on Adoption and Diffusion of Information Technology (DIGIT) (Pre-ICIS Workshop), San Francisco, CA, USA

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The purpose of the current study is to examine personal resources for the dealing with technostress and the alleviation of negative consequences arising from technostress. Based on practical observations indicating the importance of mindfulness, the theoretical lense of the job demands-resources model is used to study the effect of mindfulness on techno-stressors and emotional exhaustion. A self-rating questionnaire was distributed to employees of different companies, industries, business units, and hierarchical levels. The results of 134 responses reveal that mindfulness is associated with lower levels of techno-stressors and lower levels of emotional exhaustion. The study contributes that mindfulness is a powerful resource in technologized work environments for the effective and healthy dealing with technologies, the reduction of techno-stressors, and the prevention of adverse health outcomes. Suggestions for the application of the research results, the development of preventive measures, and the assessment of psychological risk factors are provided.