Publications by Maximilian Valta

Conference Articles (Peer Reviewed)

Valta, M., Menzel, J., Maier, C., Pflügner, K., Meier, M., and Weitzel, T. (2022)
Digital Nudging: A Systematic Literature Review and Future Research Directions
Proceedings of the 22nd ACM SIGMIS Conference on Computers and People Research, Atlanta (GA), United States
Best Paper Award

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Digital nudging is omnipresent in users’ daily lives and constantly influences decisions in digital choice environments that require users to make decisions such as web-based forms or mobile apps. It uses interface design elements and aims to guide users' behavior in specific directions. So far, there is quite a lot of research in that stream, whereby each article focuses on one specific context in which digital nudging is applied. To assist researchers and practitioners that aim to study or design information systems, we provide an overview of existent research in that stream. Following the groundedtheory method, we categorize 88 publications and reveal ten forms and five contexts of digital nudging. We also provide an overview of relationships between forms of digital nudging and their contexts. Our findings contribute to digital nudging research by offering an in-depth and structured overview of existing research and future research directions.

Hildebrandt , Y., Valta, M., and Beimborn, D. (2022)
Quantifying the Digital Innovation Mindset: Development of a Measurement Instrument
Proceedings of the 22nd ACM SIGMIS Conference on Computers and People Research, Atlanta (GA), United States

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The ‘digital mindset’ is frequently raised by both researchers and practitioners to be an essential factor of the human side of digitalization to successfully cope with the arising challenges of digitalization. Despite existing conceptualizations of the construct, the literature provides no operationalization for quantitative research, so far. Our research pursues the goal to address the question of how the digital mindset can be measured. Literature- and Delphi study-based approaches were used to develop various types of scales which were pre-validated by experts and statistically validated. For contentual validation, 26 participants were interviewed and subsequently completed the developed scales in a panel study. The resulting interview statements were rated by two independent raters and the results compared with the scale results. The correlations of the answers from using the different measures indicate that the developed survey scales can serve as proxies for the qualitative approach, which is assumed to measure the ‘true’ level of the digital mindset. In the future, researchers can choose from different scales based on their requirements for precision and efficiency (i.e., time needed to complete the survey items).

Valta, M., Hildebrandt , Y., and Maier, C. (2022)
Reducing Technostress: The Role of Digital Mindset
Proceedings of the 28th Americas Conference on Information Systems (AMCIS), Minneapolis (MN), United States

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Organizations invest lots of effort and costs in reducing technostress, as it harms their employees’ well-being and reduces their work performance. Therefore, it is imperative to mitigate technostress. We suppose that each individual has a unique digital mindset, a malleable factor describing their specific ways of thinking and awareness, which guides how to react to techno-stressors. We build on the transactional model of stress and survey 151 employees to test the role of the digital mindset. Our results show that individuals with a strong digital mindset respond less strongly to techno-stressors with reduced job performance, reduced job satisfaction, and increased turnover intention. We contribute to research by carving out that individuals react to techno-stressors align with their digital mindset, which might, thus, be an effective way to avoid that techno-stressors have adverse impacts on individuals and organizations.

Valta, M. and Maier, C. (2022)
Digital Nudging to Reduce Techno-Stressors: Insights from Qualitative and Quantitative Studies
Proceedings of the 28th Americas Conference on Information Systems (AMCIS), Minneapolis (MN), United States

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Technostress has negative consequences for employees‘ health and job performance. Therefore, organizations search for effective strategies to reduce technostress. Existent research shows that organizational, such as technical support and individual factors, including the user's personality, influence techno-stressors. We aim to complement this by focusing on technological factors, such as the design of digital technologies. We, therefore, use knowledge from digital nudging literature to consider how this might offer a different, technological-oriented strategy to reduce techno-stressors. We collected data from 102 employees and offer two findings. First, we identify eight digital nudges used in organizations to reduce techno-stressors. Second, we offer insights into the usefulness of these eight digital nudges to reduce specific techno-stressors. With those results, we contribute to the existing literature by identifying digital nudging as a practical approach to reducing techno-stressors and providing appropriate digital nudging forms for each of the five techno-stressors.

Valta, M., Pflügner, K., and Maier, C. (2021)
Guiding Companies to Reduce Technostress: A Mixed-Methods Study Deriving Practice-Oriented Recommendations
Proceedings of the 54th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS)

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Technostress is a major challenge for employees using information technology. Technostress research has revealed the causes, i.e. techno-stressors, and resulting adverse consequences for employees and companies. However, there is a lack of practical insights guiding companies on how to reduce technostress. To offer such practical insights, we follow a mixed-methods approach. The qualitative study bases on eleven expert interviews and reveals seven measures that reduce technostress. We then elaborate on these interview results with a quantitative study of 110 employees. The quantitative results reveal the degree to which the seven measures are useful to reduce specific techno-stressors. Our results show that although there are measures used in practice, none reduces all different techno-stressors. We complement existent theoretical technostress research by offering practice-oriented recommendations on how to reduce technostress. Based on the illustration of which measures are useful for which techno-stressors, practitioners can choose the measures that best fits their needs.