Mattke Jens

M.Sc. (International Information Systems Management)

Jens Mattke, ist wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter am Lehrstuhl für Wirtschaftsinformatik und Dienstleistungen an der Universität Bamberg. Er arbeitet im VAWi-Projekt, welches den größten deutschsprachen Ferstudienmaster in Wirtschaftsinformatik anbietet (VAWi). In diesem Projekt ist er für die operative Leitung des Studiengangs, das Management der IT-Infrastruktur sowie die strategische Entwicklung des Studiengangs verantwortlich.

In seiner Forschung beschäftigt er sich mit der Nutzung digitaler Technologien im E-Commerce (z.B. In-App-Advertising, personalisierte Werbung, Einsatz von Blockchain) und erarbeitet insbesondere methodische und theoretische Beiträge durch konfigurationale Forschungsansätze.

Seine Arbeiten wurden in Fachzeitschriften wie dem MIS Quarterly (MISQ), Journal of the Association for Information Systems (JAIS), European Journal of Information Systems (EJIS), Information and Management (I&M), MIS Quarterly Executive (MISQE), International Journal of Information Management (IJIM), Business & Information Systems Engineering (BISE) sowie auf mehreren internationalen Konferenzen (z.B. ICIS, ECIS, AMCIS, HICSS) veröffentlicht.

Seine Forschung wurde mit dem SIGADIT 2019 und dem International Conference on Wirtschaftsinformatik 2019 Best Paper Award ausgezeichnet.

Im Rahmen seiner Lehre ist Jens Betreuer der Lehrveranstaltung "E-Finance". Außerdem ist er für die Lehrinhalte Data Analytics und Machine Learning in der Lehrveranstaltung "Data Science" verantwortlich.

Ausgewählte Veröffentlichungen

Mattke, J., Maier, C., Reis, L., and Weitzel, T. (2021)
In-app advertising: a two-step qualitative comparative analysis to explain clicking behavior
European Journal of Marketing , , https://doi.org/10.1108/EJM-03-2020-0210 (VHB-JOURQUAL 3 Rating: C)

View Abstract
Individuals only click on a very small fraction of the in-app advertisements (ads) they are exposed to. Despite this fact, organizations spend generously placing in-app ads without theoretical knowledge of how the structure and the semantics of in-app ads influence individuals’ clicking behavior. This study aims to identify how the processing of structural and semantic factors leads to clicking behavior. Based on the limited capacity theory, this paper proposes that the sequential processing of structural and semantic factors leads to clicking behavior. To mirror the sequential process, this paper applies a process-oriented configurational approach and performs a two-step qualitative comparative analysis (QCA) using 262 incidents of exposure to in-app ads. The results support the proposed sequential processing and show that neither structural nor semantic factors alone lead to clicking behavior. This paper reveals four different paths of sequential processing of in-app ads that lead to clicking behavior. The results show that individuals click on non-animated in-app ads even though these are perceived as irritating or privacy-concerning. When the in-app ads are animated, individuals do only click on them when these are not irritating, privacy-concerning and personalized. Organizations can use these findings to improve their in-app ads and generate more clicks. This study recommends that organizations place in-app ads in a prominent location, design them similar to the design of the app and use bright colors. The advertising message needs to have new and relevant information in a credible and entertaining way. Depending on the degree of personalization, organizations should use different sizes of the in-app ad and only use animation if it is unlikely that the in-app ad caused irritation or privacy concerns. Organizations can use these findings to improve their in-app ads and generate more clicks. This paper recommends that organizations place in-app ads in a prominent location, design them similar to the design of the app and with bright colors. The advertising message needs to have new and relevant information in a credible and entertaining way. Depending on the degree of personalization, organizations should use different sizes of the in-app ad and only use animation if it is unlikely that the in-app ad caused irritation or privacy concerns. From the in-app ad perspective, this study is the first to theoretically develop and empirically show the sequential processing of structural and semantic factors of in-app ads. From the methodological perspective, this study applies an advanced configurational two-step QCA approach, which is capable of analyzing sequential processes and is new to marketing research.

Mattke, J., Maier, C., Reis, L., and Weitzel, T. (2020)
Herd behavior in social media: The role of Facebook likes, strength of ties, and expertise
Information & Management (57:8), 103370, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.im.2020.103370 (VHB-JOURQUAL 3 Rating: B)

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When do social media users click on sponsored content or intend to visit the website at a later time? A qualitative comparative analysis (QCA) using arguments based on herd theory, strength of ties, and social distance shows that only “likes” from socially close and knowledgeable users can consistently generate click-through or view-through intentions. Considering social tie strength in a herd behavior context, the analysis of sufficient configurations for click- and view-through intentions provides a nuanced perspective on social media user behavior and social influence. For instance, click-through intention requires observing a “like” from a close person, while view-through intentions can also develop after observing “likes” from less close acquaintances, yet in the last case only if the user assumes the acquaintance is better informed regarding the sponsored content. In addition, a “like” from a close friend deemed better informed can even make a user click on a sponsored content that was not considered valuable before.

Mattke, J. and Maier, C. (2021)
Gamification: Explaining brand loyalty in mobile applications
AIS Transactions on Human-Computer Interaction (13:1), p.62-81, https://doi.org/10.17705/1thci.00142 (VHB-JOURQUAL 3 Rating: k.R.)

View Abstract
Gamification is one specific way to increase mobile app users' brand loyalty. We propose that the frequency with which one uses immersion-, achievement- and social-related features relates to brand loyalty. To provide empirical evidence for this proposal, we obtained quantitative data from surveying 243 users on the mobile application Duolingo and conducted a fuzzy-set qualitative comparative analysis (fsQCA). We found that users need to frequently use immersion- and achievement-related features to result in high brand loyalty. On the contrary, we found users who infrequently use at least two gamification features have low brand loyalty. These findings extend the gamification literature by revealing an interaction between multiple gamification features and extend mobile application research by showing how gamification features relate to high and low brand loyalty. We also guide practitioners on how to identify users at risk to discontinue and reduce customer churn.

Müller, L., Mattke, J., Maier, C., and Weitzel, T. (2017)
The Curse of Mobile Marketing: A Mixed Methods Study on Individuals' Switch to Mobile Ad Blockers
Proceedings of the 38th International Conference on Information Systems (ICIS), Seoul, Korea

View Abstract
Mobile marketing investment continues to rise steadily even though online publishers have not realized the desired returns, due to increased use of mobile ad blockers. In this study, we take a mixed methods approach, embracing qualitative, quantitative and configurational approaches, to understand why individuals switch to using mobile ad blockers. We draw on the pull-push-mooring model to evaluate what configurations of pull, push and mooring factors influence individuals' decision to switch to using mobile ad blockers, identifying four distinct configurations of influencing factors resulting in the intention to switch. Furthermore, we specify the unequal effects of influencing factors and validate the quality of our results. Our research deepens the theoretical understanding of the phenomenon of switching to mobile ad blockers and provides valuable implications to online publishers facing the challenge of rising mobile ad blocker use.

Mattke, J., Maier, C., Weitzel, T., and Thatcher, J.B. (2021)
Qualitative comparative analysis in the information systems discipline: a literature review and methodological recommendations
Internet Research , , https://doi.org/10.1108/INTR-09-2020-0529 (VHB-JOURQUAL 3 Rating: k.R.)

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Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA) is a promising, powerful method that is increasingly used for IS research. However, the Information Systems (IS) discipline still lacks a shared understanding of how to conduct and report QCA. This paper introduces the fundamental concepts of QCA, summarizes the status quo, and derives recommendations for future research. A descriptive literature review in major IS outlets summarizes how and why QCA has been used in the IS discipline, critically evaluates the status quo, and derives recommendations for future QCA studies. The literature review reveals 32 empirical research articles in major IS journals that have used the QCA method. Articles applied QCA to a broad range of research topics at the individual and organizational levels, mainly as a standalone analysis for theory development, elaboration and testing. The authors also provide evidence that most published IS research articles do not take full advantage of the potential QCA, such as analyzing necessary causal conditions or testing the robustness of QCA results. The authors provide seven actionable recommendations for future IS research using QCA.

Mattke, J., Maier, C., Reis, L., and Weitzel, T. (2020)
Bitcoin investment: a mixed methods study of investment motivations
European Journal of Information Systems (EJIS) , , https://doi.org/10.1080/0960085X.2020.1787109 (VHB-JOURQUAL 3 Rating: A)

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Bitcoin is a well-established blockchain-based cryptocurrency that has attracted a great deal of attention from media and regulators alike. While millions of individuals invest in bitcoin, their motivations for doing so are less clear than with traditional investment decisions. We argue that the technical nature of bitcoin investments gives it unique characteristics and, consequently, that we lack a thorough understanding of how this affects the motivations behind bitcoin investment. We use a mixed method approach consisting of qualitative (n = 73) and quantitative (n = 150) studies and fuzzy-set qualitative comparative analysis (fsQCA) to identify seven bitcoin-specific motivations (profit expectancy, ease of bitcoin acquisition, support of bitcoin ideology, investment skills, risk affinity, anticipated and experienced inaction regret) and how configurations of them explain bitcoin investment. The findings reveal, among others, that some individuals invest in bitcoin because they support the bitcoin ideology. Contrary to the traditional investment literature, profit expectancy is not a necessary condition to the extent that there is one empirical configuration of motivations that explains that individuals also invest in bitcoin even if they do not expect profits. The results disclose non-trivial investment motivation configurations and lay the groundwork for future studies of the role of cryptocurrencies in society.